Starbucks continuing the fast global spread

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Especially in cities, no matter where we are, a random Starbucks jumps out and entices coffee lovers with the latest hazelnut concoction. We take five steps out of the coffee shop, and we are at another Starbucks chain location.

Starbucks dominates the coffee world and their hold on customers will only continue to grow.

Indonesia Today recently reported on Starbucks recent claim to produce 100 more store location in Indonesia by 2016 and 100 in the Philippines by 2017. 

Indonesia Today reported:

Howard Schultz, Starbucks chairman, president and ceo, committed to continuing to invest in the region following this week’s market visit to Indonesia and the Philippines, where he met with Starbucks partners (employees) and customers.

“With a population of more than 600 million people, an emerging middle class that is driving strong consumption and a robust and resilient economy, Southeast Asia presents a compelling growth opportunity for Starbucks,” (said Schultz).

Yes, we have seen the Seattle based company do good for the environment and small town farmers, but does the world really need the world count of Starbucks increasing by the hundreds?

Here in the states, no. However, other countries may not mind.

According to an interview with “Aaron Allen, founder of Orlando, Fla.-based Aaron Allen & Associates LLC, a global restaurant consultancy,” conducted by Nation’s Restaurant News, my American view of chain shops may be vastly  different than that of someone in another part of the world.

“Consumers in emerging markets don’t view chain restaurants with the same stigma as we have come to view them in the States. In fact, they welcome and are flocking to them for all the obvious reasons, but also because they are often starved for the higher standards of consistency, service, safety, sanitation, and novelty the Western chains are bringing along with the cache of being an American brand,” (said Allen).

In Southeast Asian countries  Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Singapore and the Philippines, Starbucks already currently owns and operates over 700 stores.

Differing greatly from the 10,787 Starbucks locations in the United states and the 17,003 globally in 2011, according to company statistics.

That  sounds like enough. But, alas, the international franchise continues to grow. With their growth, however, they are promising to continue to better farmers and residents as reported by Daily Coffee News in a recent report referencing Schultzes company announcement of progress:

“Emerging markets, particularly in the Middle East and Southeast Asia, are having a booming population growth,” Allen said, “and that equals demand and a population density. There’s also an amazing thirst for American and Western brands.”

Allen said the U.S. restaurant industry is very sophisticated. “The competition in America is such that operators here have become much more sophisticated and have more fully expressed — and formalized — standard operating procedures,” he said. “Consumers in emerging markets don’t view chain restaurants with the same stigma as we have come to view them in the States. In fact, they welcome and are flocking to them for all the obvious reasons, but also because they are often starved for the higher standards of consistency, service, safety, sanitation, and novelty the Western chains are bringing along with the cache of being an American brand.”

Maybe the growth of the famous chain may not be bad event for some locations, but if I see another Starbucks lining the streets of Washington, D.C., I may go a bit insane with the lack of coffee diversity.

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